About World Animal Foundation
get active for animals
JOIN
DONATE
ADOPT

ABOUT WAF

Through our volunteer network, the World Animal Foundation attempts to make the world a more compassionate place for all animals - wild animals, companion animals, aquatic animals and farm animals. Through grass roots action and activism, WAF bridged the gap between animal and environmental issues.

The Foundation has directly rescued thousands of animals and supports wildlife sanctuaries throughout the US. In addition, WAF engages in Trap-Neuter-Return of feral cats, animal adoptions, low cost spay-neuter programs and numerous animal concerns campaigns.

Membership in the organization is free. Donations are always appreciated and needed to carryout our crucial mission of helping animals and the planet. Help make a difference!
The World Animal Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and protection of the planet and the animals that inhabit it. WAF works with other not-for-profit organizations dedicated to planet preservation and animal issues. WAF works through public education, research, investigations, animal rescue, legislation, special events, and direct action.

WAF is an all volunteer organization. The organization has no paid officers and uses all donations towards animal and environmental programs: direct rescue, educational programs and animal sanctuaries. Utilizing volunteerism, WAF has kept operating costs to a bare minimum while maximizing our ability to help animals.

​WAF has members throughout the world and on every continent. 
The World Animal Foundation Monkey Hollow Wildlife Sanctuary is a 28 acre wildlife refuge located in Oneida along the Cumberland Plateau in the Appalachian foothills of eastern Kentucky. The sanctuary is nestled in the Daniel Boone National Forest and supports a diverse array of forest, aquatic, wetland, and upland habitats. The steep hills have served to insulate and isolate, creating a special landscape of majestic forest and wildlands.

The WAF Monkey Hollow Wildlife Sanctuary is a safe haven to many species of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and other wildlife including: black bears, deer, bobcats, chipmunks, squirrels, elk, fox, shrews, voles, opossums, skunks, raccoons, rabbits, wild turkeys, woodchucks, songbirds, hawks, owls, eagles, bats, vultures, hummingbirds, turtles, snakes, lizards, frogs, toads, salamanders and treefrogs. Monkey Hollow Wildlife Sanctuary consists of sloping hills, ridge top flats, narrow valleys, creeks and ponds, hardwood forests and bottom wildlands. The sanctuary provides habitat for all wildlife: large, small, endangered and common.

The World Animal Foundation Animal Retirement Center houses special needs dogs and cats. In addition, WAF utilizes volunteers to provide foster homes for animals awaiting adoption. WAF works with other nonprofit animal rescue groups and provides a nationwide database of shelter animals.

WAF has recruited members from around the globe to educate the public about environmental and animal issues. Our large and informative website acts as a one-stop information portal for people wishing to learn more about animals and the earth. Visitors can print dozens of free flyers and fact sheets and surf hundreds of articles regarding wildlife, endangered species, companion animals, aquatic animals and farm animals.

Join WAF today for FREE!

Join World Animal Foundation

Around the world, individuals, groups and organizations are making a difference for animals and the planet every day. From saving a companion animal from cruelty, to saving an entire species from extinction, simple choices and actions that you can make will help save animals and the earth.

You can make a difference for animals by adopting an animal, recycling, choosing humane products, donating to a charity of your choice, distributing flyers and fact sheets, encouraging humane legislation, planting wildlife gardens, trapping and neutering feral cats, volunteering, and educating others about earth and animal issues.

Together, our collective efforts to protect and preserve animals and the environment is making a difference. Join the effort today; become an earth and animal advocate.
JOIN WAF FOR FREE
Contact World Animal Foundation
Contact World Animal Foundation at getactive@WorldAnimal.Foundation or use the online Contact Form. Your Question, Comment or Concern will be forwarded to the appropriate WAF Officer, Tree Frog Trading, or Animal Action Volunteer for a quick response.

WAF Customer Service Email Address
getactive@WorldAnimal.Foundation

WAF Mailing Address
World Animal Foundation
PO Box 185
Oneida, Kentucky
40972
Name
Phone
Message
Email
Submit
CONTACT
WORLD ANIMAL FOUNDATION
Donate to World Animal Foundation
HELP MAKE A DIFFERENCE

It is only through generous donations from individuals like you that makes it possible for World Animal Foundation to carry out its mission of preserving and protecting the planet and the animals that inhabit it. Donate online by credit card: Fast, Easy & Secure. Start making a difference for the animals and the planet today. Donate to the World Animal Foundation...
DONATE TO WAF
Our Earth & Animals Advocate Magazine
  1. Providing For Companion Animals When You Die
    16 Oct, 2017
    Providing For Companion Animals When You Die
    We hope that those we leave behind will care enough about us and what we would have wanted for our beloved companion animals to take them in and give them a loving home. Some families will do the right thing, but many others surrender their deceased family member's animals to high-kill shelters or even have them euthanized. It is the responsibility of all animal guardians to provide for their animals in the event of their death or serious disability. But be aware that the law sees an animal as
  2. 16 Oct, 2017
    Kids Can Help Animals At School
    Kids can help save the planet and its animals. Here are some easy ways to help animals at school: Start An Animal Club Find out what needs to be done in your community to help animals and get going! Your club doesn’t have to start off big. Begin with a few friends who think like you do and you’ll be amazed at what you can accomplish. Make posters of animals available for adoption at the shelter. Create bookmarks with humane messages to sell and raise funds. Volunteer to help clean cages or
  3. Stop Animal Experimentation
    16 Oct, 2017
    Stop Animal Experimentation
    Vivisection, the practice of experimenting on animals, began because of religious prohibitions against the dissection of human corpses. When religious leaders finally lifted these prohibitions, it was too late - vivisection was already entrenched in medical and educational institutions.   Estimates of the number of animals tortured and killed annually in U.S. laboratories diverge widely - from 17 to 70 million animals. The Animal Welfare Act requires laboratories to report the number of animals
  4. Make Less Waste
    16 Oct, 2017
    Make Less Waste
    All the garbage you throw away is destined to end up in a landfill. What’s more, most of the items constituting your garbage (metal, plastic, paper, and everything else) was probably created using environmentally harmful methods. When you produce less trash, you ease up your environmental impact. Consider doing the following: Purchase reusable products, and avoid buying new ones. Take care of, and repair, the ones you currently own. Use glass containers instead of plastic. Stop using plastic
  5. Impacts Of Coal Mining
    16 Oct, 2017
    Impacts Of Coal Mining
    Coal is our most abundant “fossil fuel”. China is now the chief coal producer, followed by the United States. Other major coal producers are Australia and India. Five countries – China, the United States, India, Japan and Russia – account for more than 75% of worldwide coal consumption. The US has more coal than the rest of the world has oil. There is still enough coal underground in the United States alone to provide energy for the next 200 to 300 years. But coal is far from a perfect fuel.
  6. Rates Of Tropical Deforestation
    16 Oct, 2017
    Rates Of Tropical Deforestation
    Several international groups produce routine estimates of tropical deforestation, most notably the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, which has been producing a global forest resources assessment every five to ten years since the late 1940s. The FAO report is based on statistics provided by countries themselves, and because the ability of countries to accurately assess their forest resources varies depending on their financial, technological, and institutional
  7. Grasslands
    16 Oct, 2017
    Grasslands
    Grasslands habitats are dominated by grasses with few large shrubs or trees. The three main types of grasslands include temperate grasslands, tropical grasslands or savannas and steppe grasslands. Grasslands have dry seasons and rainy seasons. They are susceptible to fires during dry seasons. ●  Temperate grasslands have a lack trees and large shrubs and are dominated by grass. The soil has an upper layer that is nutrient-rich. Seasonal droughts result in fires that keep trees and shrubs from
  8. The Pork Industry
    16 Oct, 2017
    The Pork Industry
    Only pigs in movies spend their lives running across sprawling pastures and relaxing in the sun. On any given day in the U.S., there are more than 65 million pigs on factory farms, and 110 million are killed for food each year. Mother pigs (sows)—who account for almost 6 million of the pigs in the U.S.—spend most of their lives in individual “gestation” crates. These crates are about 7 feet long and 2 feet wide—too small to allow the animals even to turn around. After giving birth to piglets,
  9. Insects
    16 Oct, 2017
    Insects
    ADOPT AN INSECT Insects are cold blooded arthropods and represent 90% of all life forms on earth. They are among the most diverse groups of animals on the planet, with over 1 million different known species and as many as 9 million more yet to be discovered. Insects have three body parts: head, thorax and abdomen. They have three pairs of legs with six joints and they have two antennae. Bugs have external skeletons. These “exoskeletons” contain sense organs for sensing smell, sound, light,
  10. Centipedes
    16 Oct, 2017
    Centipedes
    ADOPT A CENTIPEDE Centipedes are arthropods belonging to the class Chilopoda of the subphylum Myriapoda. They are elongated creatures with series of body segments, with one pair of legs per body segment. Despite the name, centipedes can have a varying number of legs from under 20 to over 300. Centipedes have an odd number of pairs of legs, therefore there is no centipede with exactly 100 legs. They have a pair of venom claws and are a predominantly carnivorous. Centipedes normally have a drab
  11. Koalas
    16 Oct, 2017
    Koalas
    ADOPT A KOALA Koalas have soft, wool-like fur that is gray above and white below. Their fur is mostly white on the underside below the neck, and their ears have long white hairs on the tips. The koala resembles a bear, but is actually a marsupial, a special kind of mammal which carries its young in a pouch. They are rather small, round animals, weigh about 30 pounds and on average grow to be 2 feet tall. Koalas can live as long as 17 years, although high mortality rates (due to car fatalities
  12. Rabbits
    13 Oct, 2017
    Rabbits
    ADOPT A RABBIT Rabbits are small mammals found naturally in several parts of the world. Rabbit habitats include woods, meadows, grasslands, deserts and wetlands. These intelligent, social animals live in groups, and the best known species, the European rabbit, lives in underground burrows, or rabbit holes. Rabbits are crepuscular, most active at dawn and dusk. Rabbits are herbivores who feed on grass, nuts and berries, vegetables and fruit. They dig burrows to hide and store food. Their large
  13. Fish
    13 Oct, 2017
    Fish
    ADOPT A FISH Fish are cold blooded, live in water and are covered in scales. They breathe through gills located on the sides of their heads. Their gills take oxygen out of the water around them so they can breathe. Their limbs, if they have any, are in the shape of fins and do not have digits. They exhibit greater species diversity than any other group of vertebrates, with over 32,000 known species. Fish live in oceans and freshwater ecosystems. Well adapted to their water world, fish secrete a
  14. Corals
    13 Oct, 2017
    Corals
    ADOPT A CORAL Corals are marine invertebrates in the class Anthozoa of phylum Cnidaria. They typically live in compact colonies of many identical individual polyps. The group includes the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton. Corals are sessile, which means that they permanently attach themselves to the ocean floor, essentially "taking root" like most plants do. We certainly cannot recognize them by their faces or other
  15. Kangaroos
    13 Oct, 2017
    Kangaroos
    ADOPT A KANGAROO Kangaroos have powerful hind legs and short, thumbless forelimbs. Kangaroos can travel at speeds up to 30 miles per hour and can leap some 30 feet. Kangaroos use their long tails for balancing. Their bodies are covered in thick, coarse, wooly hair that can be shades of gray, brown or red. Kangaroos are marsupials, which means that females carry newborns, or "joeys," in a pouch on the front of their abdomens. Kangaroos have developed a number of adaptations to a dry, infertile
  16. 11 Oct, 2017
    Pet Trade Jeopardizing Survival Of Rare Reptiles
    A gecko for your terrarium? Or a tortoise? Or would you rather have a snake? Reptiles are exceedingly popular as “pets”. The illicit pet trade is booming. Between 2004 and 2014, official imports to the EU alone came to just under 21 million live specimens, more than six million of these ended up on the German market. These also include a large number of representatives of threatened species that can be sold at extremely high profits. Some collectors are quite willing to pay prices of several
  17. Help Stop Product Testing On Animals
    11 Oct, 2017
    Help Stop Product Testing On Animals
    Every year, millions of animals suffer and die in painful tests to determine the "safety" of cosmetics and household products. Substances ranging from eye shadow and soap to furniture polish and oven cleaner are tested on rabbits, rats, guinea pigs, dogs, and other animals, despite the fact that test results do not help prevent or treat human illness or injury. In eye irritancy tests, a liquid, flake, granule, or powdered substance is dropped into the eyes of a group of albino rabbits. The
  18. Palm Oil Threats To Forests & Orangutans
    11 Oct, 2017
    Palm Oil Threats To Forests & Orangutans
    Once found all over South-East Asia and even the far reaches of Southern China, orangutans have found themselves squeezed to just the two islands of Sumatra and Borneo. The great red-haired apes have been around for almost 400,000 years, but have seen their numbers dwindle alarmingly from over 200,000 a century ago to only 45,000 presently. The habitats of this iconic animal have been pushed to the rain forests in the northern fringes of the Sumatra island of Indonesia and just the south-eastern
  19. Cosmetic Surgery For Dogs & Cats
    11 Oct, 2017
    Cosmetic Surgery For Dogs & Cats
    TAIL DOCKING Tails are usually docked on 2-10 day old puppies, without either general or local anesthesia. If the procedure is done by a veterinarian, the tail is clamped a short distance from the body, and the portion of the tail outside the clamp is cut or torn away. Many breeders dock their pups themselves using a method that has been proven to be far more painful - "banding," or tying off the tail. This stops the blood supply, which results in dry gangrene. The dead portion of the tail
  20. Foie Gras
    11 Oct, 2017
    Foie Gras
    The methods used to turn duck and goose livers into the "delicacy" known as pâté de foie gras are anything but delicate. Foie gras is a French term meaning "fatty liver" and it is produced by force-feeding birds. The ducks and geese force-fed for foie gras are compelled to consume much more high-energy food—mostly corn—than they would eat voluntarily. This damages their liver and often kills them. The Scientific Committee on Animal Health and Welfare for the European Union found many examples
Our Campaigns
Our How to Help Guides
  1. Make Less Waste
    16 Oct, 2017
    Make Less Waste
    All the garbage you throw away is destined to end up in a landfill. What’s more, most of the items constituting your garbage (metal, plastic, paper, and everything else) was probably created using environmentally harmful methods. When you produce less trash, you ease up your environmental impact. Consider doing the following: Purchase reusable products, and avoid buying new ones. Take care of, and repair, the ones you currently own. Use glass containers instead of plastic. Stop using plastic
  2. Balloon Releases: Deadly Litter
    04 Oct, 2017
    Balloon Releases: Deadly Litter
    If you are planning a balloon release for a special occasion, understand that the moment or two of delight the balloons provide can have deadly consequences for the environment. When you release balloons you are littering and your litter creates numerous threats to wildlife. Before you plan a balloon release ask yourself, “What happens to the balloons? Where do they go?” While some balloons burst, others gradually deflate and fall back to earth where they can have cruel consequences for
  3. Help Save Leopards
    04 Oct, 2017
    Help Save Leopards
    Leopards are beautiful cats generally found in the dense, damp, forested areas of India and Southeast Asia. Once common in all parts of Africa apart from the Sahara, they have now disappeared from most parts of northern Africa (apart from a few areas of the Atlas Mountains) and are scarce in the extreme west of the continent. The leopard is under extreme threat, especially in the Middle East and southwest Asia. It is listed as Near Threatened on the IUCN Red List because it is declining in large
  4. Tread Lightly
    02 Oct, 2017
    Tread Lightly
    Tread Lightly! was started by the United States Forest Service in 1985 as a public awareness program. In 1990, Tread Lightly! became a nonprofit organization. The Tread Lightly philosophy encourages off-highway enthusiasts to enjoy the outdoors responsibly through stewardship to further the goals of responsible and ethical recreation. TREAD LIGHTLY Travel on trails or other legal areas. Keep your feet and wheels on open roads, trails or in legal riding areas. When you step off trail, watch
  5. Get Out & Walk
    24 Sep, 2017
    Get Out & Walk
    Many people enjoy walking as a recreation, and it is one of the best forms of exercise. One of the many benefits of walking is the time spent enjoying nature. Spending time outside is important for the body, mind and soul. Get outside and enjoy nearby parks, green spaces, nature preserves and communities...all while improving your health. Regular, brisk exercise of any kind can improve confidence, stamina, energy, weight control, life expectancy and reduce stress. It can also reduce the risk
  6. Be A Power Saver
    24 Sep, 2017
    Be A Power Saver
    Turning on lights in our homes is as easy as flipping a switch. We do it all the time. But do you ever wonder where the electricity comes from? It all starts at a power plant. It might be hundreds of miles away from your light switch. A power plant makes electricity. There are different kinds of power plants, and they make electricity in different ways. Many of them are coal power plants and natural gas power plants. They burn fuel and use the heat to run a machine that makes electricity for us
  7. 10 Ways To Help Wildlife
    24 Sep, 2017
    10 Ways To Help Wildlife
    Habitat loss and the extinction of species are devastating consequences of irresponsible human actions. The problem’s complexity and reach often leads people to feel unable to make a difference. However, every single action we take is crucial in bringing about change. Although individually our contribution may seem small, the sum of our efforts can really make a huge difference. Protect Wildlife Habitat The most pressing issue that threatens species is their progressive loss of habitat. Animal
  8. Help Nature To Help Us
    19 Sep, 2017
    Help Nature To Help Us
    We can all take notice of our environment. We can learn how our planet works. We can learn how to live on it without making a mess of it. We can help to keep it magnificent for ourselves, our children and grandchildren, and other living things besides us. You can help by growing your own vegetables and fruits. You can help by planting a tree. Your new plants and trees will help to remove the greenhouse gas CO2 from the air. If you grow some of your own food, you will also help to prevent more
  9. Help Save Sharks
    14 Sep, 2017
    Help Save Sharks
    Don't be afraid OF sharks; be afraid FOR them. There are more misunderstandings and untruths about sharks than almost any other group of animals on the planet. While many people fear sharks, it is the sharks who should be fearing us. According to the shark attack file, maintained by the Florida Museum of Natural History, on average 5 people die worldwide from shark attacks. Research published in 2006 found that up to 70 million sharks are killed by humans each year, mostly for their fins. This
  10. Help Save Bears
    08 Sep, 2017
    Help Save Bears
    There are eight types of bear in the world: polar bears, brown (or grizzly) bears, American black bears, Asiatic black bears, sun bears, sloth bears, spectacled bears and giant panda bears. Some are on the verge of extinction, but all face threats. LOSS OF HABITAT Probably the biggest threat to bears worldwide is the loss of their habitat and, with it, the loss of their food source. Giant Pandas rely on bamboo forests for their food, but many of these have been cut down by Chinese farmers. It
  11. Save The Whales
    03 Sep, 2017
    Save The Whales
    Whales are hunted for their meat and other body parts. The oil from their bodies has been used to make lipstick, shoe polish and margarine. The practice of hunting whales began in the 9th century when Spain undertook the first organized hunt. By the 20th century, the Netherlands, Denmark, Britain, France, Germany, Norway, Japan and the United States had begun to kill large numbers of whales. Certain species of whales were hunted so much that their numbers began to decline. There were fewer
  12. Help Save Chimpanzees
    03 Sep, 2017
    Help Save Chimpanzees
    Chimpanzees are more closely related to humans than they are to gorillas. Chimpanzees and humans share 99 percent of their genetic composition. Chimpanzees are highly intelligent, probably more so than human-based tests are able to measure. They make and use tools, cooperate with and learn from each other, and can learn various forms of expression and communication, including American Sign Language and computer symbols. Chimpanzees also have good memories. HABITATS BEING DESTROYED Fewer than
  13. 10 Steps To Save Forests
    30 Aug, 2017
    10 Steps To Save Forests
    Forest are great storehouses of natural life. Nearly half of our forest are now gone. We must act now to save the earth's forest. You can help by reducing, reusing, recycling & refusing to purchase paper and wood products that that are not ecologically responsible. Every ton of paper that is recycled saves 17 trees, 4100 kilowatts of electricity, 7000 gallons of water and 90 cubic feet of landfill space. 1. Volunteer for tree-planting projects. 2. Buy firewood from "downed wood" sources 3.
  14. Save The Seals
    30 Aug, 2017
    Save The Seals
    Each year thousands of seals are killed in Canada. The seals suffer painful and lingering deaths. The weapon used is a club, the brutal hakapik. Sometimes the seals are skinned alive. Sealers often use sharpened steel hooks to drag the creatures on board their vessels. Seal-clubbing is justified by the Canadian government because its victims are adversely affecting the profits of the Newfoundland fishing industry. A harp seal can be legally killed as soon as it has begun to moult its white
  15. Save Sea Turtles
    13 Aug, 2017
    Save Sea Turtles
    Sea turtles, air-breathing reptiles with streamlined bodies and large flippers, are well adapted to life in the marine environment. They inhabit tropical and subtropical ocean waters throughout the world. Of the 7 species of sea turtles, 6 are found in U.S. waters: green, hawksbill, Kemp's ridley, leatherback, loggerhead and olive ridley. The 7th species, the flatback sea turtle, is found only in Australia. Although sea turtles live most of their lives in the ocean, adult females must return
  16. 10 Things You Can Do To Save The Oceans
    12 Aug, 2017
    10 Things You Can Do To Save The Oceans
    You can make a big difference for ocean conservation and species preservation. There are many easy lifestyle changes that can aid in the effort of saving our oceans and the animals that inhabit them.  Give Power To Your Vote Sound ocean policy depends on the election of proper public officials. Do your homework and decide wisely before casting your vote. Don’t forfeit your right to vote; on the contrary, remain politically active even after Election Day. Contact your representative and voice
  17. Save The Manatee
    05 Aug, 2017
    Save The Manatee
    While some claim the manatee is ugly, with ‘a face only a mother could love,’ most people seem drawn to this fascinating marine creature. Whether it’s their sad, puppy-like demeanor, or their sluggish, gentle manner, something about manatees is awfully endearing. The manatee, or sea cow, is an aquatic mammal. With a round cylindrical body, they can measure from 8 to 13 feet from tail to head. Weights can vary from 450 lbs for the smallest species to 1,300 lbs for the larger ones. Some can even
  18. Help Save Elephants
    02 Aug, 2017
    Help Save Elephants
    Centuries ago, the African elephant enjoyed ample representation among the teeming herds of wildlife that roamed the African continent. Today, their survival dangles on the precipice of extinction due to unchecked human population growth and overdevelopment. Once numbering in the millions, the continent-wide population in Africa is now estimated to be just under 600,000 elephants. Elephants exist in one of the most complex societal units of any land mammal. A typical elephant herd consists of a
  19. Consumers Have Huge Environmental Impact
    25 Jul, 2017
    Consumers Have Huge Environmental Impact
    Consumers have huge environmental impact. We like to blame the government or industries for the Earth's problems, but what we buy makes a big difference. The world's workshop – China – surpassed the United States as the largest emitter of greenhouse gases on Earth in 2007. But if you consider that nearly all of the products that China produces, from iPhones to tee-shirts, are exported to the rest of the world, the picture looks very different. "If you look at China's per capita
  20. 12 Steps To Become An Environmentalist
    22 Jul, 2017
    12 Steps To Become An Environmentalist
    Environmentalism is an integration of the ideology and philosophy of protecting the health of the environment and the social movement resulting from it. Issues such as conservation, preservation, ecosystem restoration, and improvement of the natural environment are foremost on the agenda of environmentalists. Concerns and threats involving the Earth's biodiversity and ecology feature at the top of the list. To be an environmentalist, follow the simple steps given below. 1. Choose Your Cause
HOW YOU CAN HELP
JOIN WAF TO HELP ANIMALS
DONATE TO HELP ANIMALS
Our Social Media
Legal Information
PRIVACY POLICY​​

World Animal Foundation, Inc. and Tree Frog Trading respect your privacy. We will never share, sell, or rent individual personal information with anyone without your advance permission or unless ordered by a court of law.

How we protect your privacy

We use security measures to protect against the loss, misuse and alteration of data used by our system.

Sharing and Usage

Information submitted to us is only available to employees managing this information for purposes of contacting you or sending you emails based on your request for information and to contracted service providers for purposes of providing services relating to our communications with you.

Why did you receive an email from us?

If you received a mailing from us, (a) your email address is either listed with us as someone who has expressly shared this address for the purpose of receiving information in the future ("opt-in"), or (b) you have registered or purchased or otherwise have an existing relationship with us. We respect your time and attention by controlling the frequency of our mailings.

How can you stop receiving email from us?

Each email sent contains an easy, automated way for you to cease receiving email from us, or to change your expressed interests. If you wish to do this, simply follow the instructions at the end of any email.

DISCLAIMER

World Animal Foundation, Inc. (WAF), a registered U.S. charitable nonprofit organization, operates this website and is solely responsible for its content. This website is provided as a public service. Users of this website are responsible for checking the accuracy, completeness, content, currency, suitability, and timeliness of all information. World Animal Foundation, Inc. makes no representations, guarantees, or warranties, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness, content, currency, suitability, and timeliness of the information provided via this website. This information is provided on an "as is" basis.

This website contains links to other websites that are maintained by third parties. WAF is not responsible for the contents of any third-party websites and shall not be liable for any claims of alleged damage or injury arising from the contents of such websites. Any links to other websites are provided as a convenience to you as a user of this website and do not imply WAF's endorsement of the linked websites or association with their operators.

COPYRIGHT INFO

For permission to use WAF content, please contact us at getactive@WorldAnimal.Foundation. Materials which are copyrighted, including, without limitation, text, videos, and photographs, may not be reproduced, retransmitted, or used for other than personal use without WAF's express written consent. Photographs, banners and buttons may not be reproduced, retransmitted, or used for any other reason without WAF's express written consent.

FAIR USE NOTICE

This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, wildlife, animal rights, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell. edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use', you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. If you are a copyright owner and wish to have your material removed or credited differently, please contact getactive@worldanimal.foundation for immediate assistance.

GUARENTEE POLICY

100% money back guarantee. Adopt An Animal Kits are returnable for any reason for a full refund on the purchase price of the product, excluding shipping.

RETURN POLICY

You may return an item for refund or replacement within 30 days of the shipment date. Shipping and handling charges are non-refundable. All returns must be accompanied by the full packet. You may want to insure your return; we cannot be responsible for lost or misdirected returns. If you paid for your order by credit card, a credit will be issued and will appear on your billing statement. 

Return items to:
World Animal Foundation
PO Box 185
Oneida, Kentucky
40972

If you have any questions regarding your order, please feel free to contact us at getactive@WorldAnimal.Foundation.